Home » The effects of cognitive and instructional coaching on the perceived sense of self-efficacy of middle school teachers of English language learners. by Sylvia Kane
The effects of cognitive and instructional coaching on the perceived sense of self-efficacy of middle school teachers of English language learners. Sylvia Kane

The effects of cognitive and instructional coaching on the perceived sense of self-efficacy of middle school teachers of English language learners.

Sylvia Kane

Published
ISBN : 9781109691481
NOOKstudy eTextbook
232 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

This two-phase sequential mixed methods research study examined the effects of the coaching process through cognitive and instructional coaching on the perceived self-efficacy of middle school teachers of English language learners. A sample of middleMoreThis two-phase sequential mixed methods research study examined the effects of the coaching process through cognitive and instructional coaching on the perceived self-efficacy of middle school teachers of English language learners. A sample of middle school content area teachers of English language learners (N = 177) completed a modified version of the Teacher Sense of Efficacy Scale (Tschannen-Moran& Woolfolk Hoy, 2001) for the quantitative component of the study. A control group of teachers not involved in the coaching process provided the study with the comparison group ( N = 97). The study then followed up with eighteen (N = 18) individual interviews to probe or explore the results in more depth, which comprised the qualitative portion. During the qualitative phase, participants were asked to engage in a strategy-ranking activity, which ranked effective English learner (EL) strategies based on a meta-analysis by Marzano (2001). The EL teacher ranking scale, which was based on the Self-Anchoring Scale (Kilpatrick & Cantril, 1960) asked the participants to provide their descriptions for the ideal and worst teacher of English language learners and then asked them to rank themselves at the present, the past, and the future based on their own criteria and provided the reasons for their rankings. The coached teachers were asked to rank their coach by providing the criteria for the ideal and worst coach, and then rank their coaches at the present, the past, and future, and provide the reasons for their rankings. An analysis of the data revealed the following six themes: (a) those who were coached displayed confidence, (b) teachers who were coached valued their coaches, (c) barriers prevented successful coaching, (d) successful EL teachers were confident in their teaching craftsmanship, (e) successful EL teachers experienced a sense of connectedness with their students, and (f) some EL teachers experienced frustration when teaching English language learners. Findings from this study provide evidence to support the use of coaching as a viable form of staff development for teachers of English language learners by raising teachers sense of self-efficacy. Recommendations for practice and for future research are presented.